MENU
 

Dr. Tim Says...

Leaky Gut Syndrome Quackery 10/02/17
4 ways to protect your brain with diet 07/18/17
Chicken skin: to eat, or not to eat 06/19/17
Change is here 06/12/17
Medical technology 03/27/17
The science behind the DASH diet, an overview: Part Two 08/01/16
The science behind the DASH diet, an overview: Part One 07/25/16
How the Standard American Diet (SAD) affects the brain (Part Two) 05/26/16
How the Standard American Diet (SAD) affects the brain 05/23/16
All "Dr. Tim Says..." Columns

Chef Tim Says...

How to make your own shrimp stock 10/09/17
Deviled Eggs 04/24/17
Roasting Fruit 04/03/17
Papadum 03/20/17
Capers make it better 02/06/17
Mustards: The Christmas Basket Challenge, Part 5 01/26/17
Canned Tuna from Spain: The Christmas Basket Challenge, Part 4 01/16/17
Ginger and Rice Noodles: The Christmas Basket Challenge, Part 3 01/12/17
All "Chef Tim Says..." Columns



 

Chef Tim Says....



Happy Lundi Gras (Fat Monday)!

Here in New Orleans we are on holiday. When I first moved here Mardi Gras didn't seem like such a big deal, and my first year I actually tried to hold clinic hours on Lundi Gras. My staff set me straight pretty quickly. Even if I wanted to work, no one, staff or patients, would come because pretty much everyone (except those in the hospitality industry) takes the Monday before Fat Tuesday off. They don't even deliver the mail here today.

New Orleans cuisine typifies what I mean when I say that the Mediterranean diet is the American diet. All of our food traditions in this country come from somewhere else, and most of those cuisines come from European countries, especially those around the Mediterranean. While many of our dishes are of northern European origin, the influence of the Mediterranean runs deep.

In New Orleans that Mediterranean influence means France, Spain, Italy and northern Africa. The "holy trinity" of bell peppers, onions and celery that many Cajun recipes start with is Spanish. Making a roux is a fundamental principle of French cuisine. The spices are taken from Italian, Spanish and African recipes. Fish predominates here as it does in those countries. All of this is wrapped up in a package that uses the ingredients at hand along the Gulf Coast: redfish, shrimp, rice, fresh veggies and beans.

We hope you enjoy your Mardi Gras, wherever you are. Here are some New Orleans recipes to flavor your celebration.

Red Beans and Rice
Shrimp Etouffee
Blackened Redfish
Jambalaya
Jambalaya Salad
Cajun Cheeseburger
Crawfish Pie
Cajun Shrimp Salad

Eat well, eat healthy, enjoy life!

Timothy S. Harlan, M.D.
Dr. Gourmet