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Dr. Tim Says...

Leaky Gut Syndrome Quackery 10/02/17
4 ways to protect your brain with diet 07/18/17
Chicken skin: to eat, or not to eat 06/19/17
Change is here 06/12/17
Medical technology 03/27/17
The science behind the DASH diet, an overview: Part Two 08/01/16
The science behind the DASH diet, an overview: Part One 07/25/16
How the Standard American Diet (SAD) affects the brain (Part Two) 05/26/16
How the Standard American Diet (SAD) affects the brain 05/23/16
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Chef Tim Says...

How to make your own shrimp stock 10/09/17
Deviled Eggs 04/24/17
Roasting Fruit 04/03/17
Papadum 03/20/17
Capers make it better 02/06/17
Mustards: The Christmas Basket Challenge, Part 5 01/26/17
Canned Tuna from Spain: The Christmas Basket Challenge, Part 4 01/16/17
Ginger and Rice Noodles: The Christmas Basket Challenge, Part 3 01/12/17
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Chef Tim Says....



How to make your own fish stock

a bowl full of shrimp shells

Making fish stock is pretty simple.

My colleague, Chef Leah Sarris, has a great method for using all of the scraps and peelings from vegetables in the kitchen: she calls it "trash and treasure." By keeping those identified as "treasure" you have a base for homemade vegetable stock. Here's a guide to making your own vegetable stock.

Stock is technically made with bones and meat (or fish) where broth is made by simmering meat or fish only (sometimes with vegetables) or just vegetables. When you use the bones for making your stock and simmer them the marrow and gelatin dissolves into the stock giving it a richer, silkier texture.

One of my favorite ways to make fish stock is to save the skin and bones from your dishes. Store them in a gallon Ziplock bag, and when the bag is full you can make stock. I also like to make shrimp stock by saving the shells from the shrimp when I peel and devein them. Shrimp stock does have a more subtle flavor than fish stock.

Place the fish and bones or the shrimp shells in a 4 quart pot and then fill with cold water. Simmer for about 90 minutes. Taste the stock while you are simmering to check for flavor. If it is weak, keep letting it simmer until it is stronger, more flavorful stock.

Strain the cooked fish and bones or shrimp shells and discard. Let the stock cool, then divide into containers. I like to put a cup in a single small Ziplock bag. When they are zipped closed and lie flat they freeze perfectly and when you need a couple of cups of stock they are ready to go.