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Special Diet Information

Coumadin® (Warfarin)
This recipe is safe for Coumadin (warfarin) users.

Lactose
Avoid this recipe if you are lactose intolerant.

Sodium
This is NOT a low sodium recipe.

GERD / Acid Reflux
This recipe contains GERD triggers and those with GERD may wish to avoid it.

Gluten Sensitivity
This recipe is NOT safe for those who are sensitive to gluten.

 

"A guy walks into a restaurant, sits down to order, and asked the waiter does he serve crawfish. The waiter says yes. The guy says 'I'll have a pizza'. He points to a chair and says, 'and a plate of chips for my crawfish friend here."

The refrigerator light goes on...

OK, I live in New Orleans now and you canít get away from crawfish. They are everywhere and so tempting to use in recipes. I donít particularly like going to crawfish boils because I donít like wrestling with a tiny little thing for a tiny bit of something to eat. This recipe uses already pulled tails (so you donít have to do the work) and you may find them in your freezer case. So simple that way and they make a great chowder.

Now, if you canít find crawfish, this chowder will be great with shrimp. Shrimp and crawfish do cook a bit differently, however. The shrimp will be much firmer so itís best to use the small baby shrimp and add them at the very last minute so that they donít overcook.

Thickening Agents - Potatoes

Thickening sauces and soups can be accomplished by a variety of ingredients but most rely on a starch. Even though starches such as flour and potatoes are mostly carbohydrate, they also have proteins that, when heated, interact with liquid to thicken them. Most cream soups begin with a roux and milk. With chowder, it is primarily the potatoes that act as the thickening agent.

I prefer russets or long whites because of the higher starch content. These potatoes also don't hold together as well when heated and, as they breakdown, make for a thicker soup.


 

Crawfish Chowder



Servings = 4 | Serving size =about 1 1/2 cups for dinner

Cooking Time = 60 Minutes

This recipe can be multiplied by 2, 3, 4, 5.

This recipe makes great leftovers.

1 tsp olive or canola oil
1 medium onion (diced)
2 medium carrots (peeled and diced)
2 large ribs celery (diced)
2 Tbsp all purpose flour
2 cup low sodium chicken or vegetable broth
4 cups water
10 ounces Idaho potatoes (diced)
8 ounces new potatoes (diced)
3/4 tsp salt
2 tsp no salt added Creole or Cajun seasoning blend
12 ounces crawfish tails
1 cup 2% milk
1 Tbsp unsalted butter

Place the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the diced onions and cook for about 2 minutes, stirring frequently. Add the carrots and celery and cook for about 3 minutes, stirring frequently.

Sprinkle the flour over the top of the cooked veggies in the pan and toss to coat well. Cook for about 2 - 3 minutes, reducing the heat to medium-low if necessary.

Add the chicken stock and stir well. Add the water and potatoes and stir well. Reduce the heat to medium-low so that the chowder will simmer slowly. Cook for about 40 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add the salt and spice blend and stir well. If the soup is too thick, add water 1/2 cup at a time to thin it a bit. The Idaho potatoes will soften faster than the new potatoes. Gently press the potatoes against the bottom of the pan to break them up slightly.

Reduce the heat to low, add the crawfish and stir well. Add the milk and stir well.

Add the unsalted butter and stir well until melted. Serve.

Nutrition Facts

Serving size = about 1 1/2 cups for dinner

Servings = 4

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Amount Per Serving

Calories 292 Calories from Fat 63
  % Daily Value
Total Fat 7g 11%
    Saturated Fat 3g 16%
    Monounsaturated Fat 3g  
    Trans Fat 0g  
Cholesterol 102mg 34%
Sodium 608mg 25%
Total Carbohydrates 38g 13%
    Dietary Fiber 5g 4%
    Sugars 8g  
Protein 21g  
Vitamin A 109% Vitamin C 52%
Calcium 16% Iron 14%
Vitamin K 14 mcg Potassium 1181 mg
Magnesium 78 mg