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Special Diet Information

Coumadin® (Warfarin)
This recipe is safe for Coumadin (warfarin) users.

Lactose
This recipe is safe for those who are lactose intolerant.

Sodium
This is a low sodium recipe.

GERD / Acid Reflux
No specific GERD triggers.

Gluten Sensitivity
This recipe is safe for those who are sensitive to gluten.

 

"If you're quiet, you're not living. You've got to be noisy and colorful and lively."
-Mel Brooks, Director

The refrigerator light goes on...

This is a really quick and very easy meal. The hardest part is chopping the potatoes and veggies. The stew almost cooks itself and the pork is a snap in the oven. A great, warming, hearty fall meal.

What is marketed in the U.S. as a sweet potato are usually yams. True sweet potatoes have a pale skin and creamy yellow flesh. These are closely related to russet potatoes and are drier and not very sweet. What is usually sold as a yam in the U.S. is actually a darker skinned sweet potato. The thick orange skin is tough and fibrous and the flesh is moist and also has a rich orange color.

Does Cooking Reduce Nutrients in Foods?

The simple answer is yes—but not by much. 

High heat can cause some vitamins to breakdown, including Vitamin C and the B Vitamins.  It’s the way foods are cooked, however, that affects the amount of vitamins in a finished recipe.  Simmering carrots in a beef stew results in a greater loss of these vitamins than when they are quickly sautéed.  Cooking does not significantly change most other nutrients, such as fats, minerals and fiber, and many are made more digestible with cooking (as with proteins in meats or fiber in cooked oats).  

Much more important is the freshness of the foods you are cooking.  The “fresh” fruits and veggies that we eat are sometimes a week or more old before they make it into our refrigerators.  In one study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, it was shown that many of the cancer preventing nutrients (known as phytochemicals) are lost as vegetables were aged under conditions similar to those in stores and your refrigerator.  Interestingly, canned or frozen vegetables are usually more nutritious because they are preserved soon after being picked.



 

Sweet Potato Stew with Maple Roasted Pork



Servings = 4 | Serving size =about 1 1/2 cups with 4 ounces pork

Cooking Time = 45 Minutes

This recipe can be multiplied by 2, 3, 4, 5.

This recipe makes great leftovers.

1 tsp olive oil
1 small onion (diced)
1 clove garlic (sliced)
2 tsp dried sage
1 1/2 lbs yams or sweet potatoes (cut into 1 inch cubes)
4 cups water
8 ounces parsnips (peeled and cut into large dice)
1/2 tsp salt
fresh ground black pepper (to taste)
1/2 cup pecan pieces
1/8 tsp salt
4 tsp maple syrup
spray oil
16 ounces pork tenderloin

Place the olive oil in a large sauce pan over medium heat. Add the onion, garlic, and sage. Cook, stirring frequently, for about 5 minutes until the onions soften slightly.

Add the yams, stir and then add the water. Increase the heat to medium high and when the water begins to boil reduce the heat until it is simmering. Cook, stirring occasionally, for about 20 minutes. As the yams begin to soften use a spoon or spatula to break them up slightly.

Add the parsnips, 1/2 tsp. salt and pepper. Stir and reduce the heat to medium low.

Place a large skillet in the oven and preheat to 425°F.

While the stew is simmering place a sheet of wax paper on the kitchen counter.

Place the pecans in a non-stick skillet over medium-high heat. Cook, stirring frequently, for about 5 minutes. Watch the nuts closely and as they begin to brown reduce the heat to medium.

Add the 1/8 tsp. salt. Cook for about one minute more until the pecans are browned.

Add 2 tsp. maple syrup and let it bubble for about ten seconds shaking the pan vigorously to coat the pecans well.

Remove the pan from the heat and stir the pecans. Turn them out of the pan onto the wax paper to cool. Separate them from each other just after placing on the wax paper so that they won't stick together.

When the parsnips are just tender, the stew should be thicker and the yams soft. Continue to stir occasionally.

When the oven is hot, spray the pan lightly with oil. Add the pork tenderloin and return the pan to the oven. Cook for about 5 minutes, then turn the pork. Drizzle the remaining 2 tsp. maple syrup over the tenderloin and return the pan to the oven. Cook for about 10 minutes more, turning at least once, until the pork is done.

Remove the pork from the oven and let stand while dishing up the stew into two bowls. Slice the pork and place it on top of the stew and then top with the candied pecans. Serve.

Nutrition Facts

Serving size = about 1 1/2 cups with 4 ounces pork

Servings = 4

.

Amount Per Serving

Calories 434 Calories from Fat 107
  % Daily Value
Total Fat 13g 19%
    Saturated Fat 2g 8%
    Monounsaturated Fat 4g  
    Trans Fat 0g  
Cholesterol 36mg 12%
Sodium 416mg 17%
Total Carbohydrates 66g 22%
    Dietary Fiber 11g 46%
    Sugars 9g  
Protein 17g  
Vitamin A 5% Vitamin C 68%
Calcium 8% Iron 13%
Vitamin K 22 mcg Potassium 1915 mg
Magnesium 88 mg