Dr. Tim Says...

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The science behind the DASH diet, an overview: Part One 07/25/16
How the Standard American Diet (SAD) affects the brain (Part Two) 05/26/16
How the Standard American Diet (SAD) affects the brain 05/23/16
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Chef Tim Says...

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Dr. Tim Says....



Oral Allergy Syndrome

one whole kiwi and one kiwi sliced in half

Oral allergy syndrome is a less threatening allergic condition most commonly associated with specific fruits and vegetables, like kiwi, apples, cherries, celery, tomatoes, and green peppers. The symptoms are not experienced with cooked foods, only those that are raw. The allergic reaction is most often tingling and/or itching of the mouth, nose, and throat. Oral allergy syndrome is an IgE-mediated immune response.1

Oral allergy syndrome does not typically appear in young children and starts appearing more commonly in older children, teens, and young adults. Often people with oral allergy syndrome can eat certain fruits and vegetables for years without issues. Interestingly, people with this syndrome often have allergies to birch, ragweed, or grass pollens, which is why it is often called "pollen-food syndrome" and is believed to be caused by cross-reactions with pollens in raw fruits, vegetables, and some tree nuts.

Foods Associated with Oral Allergy Syndrome

Birch Pollen Grass Pollen Ragweed Pollen
Apple
Almond
Carrot
Celery
Cherry
Hazelnut
Kiwi
Peach
Pear
Plum
Celery
Melons
Oranges
Peaches
Tomatoes
Banana
Cucumber
Melons
Sunflower Seeds
Zucchini

1. Webber, CM and England, RW. Oral Allergy syndrome: a clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic challenge.  Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2010; 104:101-108.

Timothy S. Harlan, M.D.
Dr. Gourmet